Te Kete Ipurangi Navigation:

Te Kete Ipurangi
Communities
Schools

Te Kete Ipurangi user options:


View in: Māori English

Activity: How does harakeke survive? – Level 4

Achievement Objectives - Whāinga Paetae: Te Aka

4.1 Recognise that there are biological processes common to all organisms, and that those occur in different ways in different species. Te Marautanga o Aotearoa: (p.101) Te Ao Tūroa, Te Rauropi 1 

4.1 Recognise that organisms are built of cells. Although cells are very small, the materials in them are involved in certain biological processes. (p15, Pūtaiao i roto i Te Marautanga o Aotearoa)

Learning Outcome

I will be able to:

identify structures of harakeke that carry out some of the life processes

identify cells in a harakeke leaf that carry out some of the life processes.

Success Criteria

I can identify structures of harakeke that carry out life processes.

I can identify cells in a harakeke leaf that carry out life processes.

All living things carry out various processes in order to stay alive such as:

  • Taking in food or making it themselves
  • Converting the food to give energy
  • Growing
  • Reproducing
  • Getting rid of unwanted waste
  • Sensing their environment
  • Movement

Different parts of the harakeke plant carry out different jobs in order to survive. Try the following activity to see how much you already know about plants.

Match the following list of structures of the harakeke plant with their job:

Harakeke structure

Job of the structure

Root (akaaka) Allows air to enter the leaf, waste gasses to leave
Root tip Makes food for the plant using carbon dioxide, water and sunlight
Leaf (whā) Stops the leaf drying out
Stem (kakau) Supports the leaf
Young leaves (rito) A case that opens when seeds are ready to be released
Seed pod (puhui hua) New growth comes from this point
Flower (puāwai) Where sexual reproduction takes place
Tiny holes in the leaves Anchors the plant and takes in water
Waxy surface of the leaf (para) Has special cells that detect (sense) gravity and moisture
Muka Holds the flower upright for pollination
Pollen inside the flowers Sweet for the birds and bees
Nectar inside the flowers A fine powder produced by certain plants when they reproduce

You can find out more about the harakeke leaf by clicking on the magnifying glasses below.

Harakeke leaf looked at under a microscope

All living things carry out various processes in order to stay alive.  Have a look at your  table of harakeke structures and their jobs, and use this information to name the harakeke structures in the table below:

Life process

Harakeke structure

Making food  
Converting the food to give energy  
Growing  
Reproducing  
Getting rid of unwanted waste  
Sensing their environment  
Movement  

Teacher's note

The correct definitions of the harakeke structures are:

Harakeke structure

Job of the structure

Root (akaaka) Anchors the plant and takes in water
Root tip Has special cells that detect (sense) gravity and moisture
Leaf (whā) Makes food for the plant using carbon dioxide, water and sunlight
Stem (kakau) Holds the flower upright for pollination
Young leaves (rito) New growth comes from this point
Seed pod (puhui hua) A case that opens when seeds are ready to be released
Flower (puāwai) Where sexual reproduction takes place
Tiny holes in the leaves Allows air to enter the leaf and waste gasses to leave
Waxy surface of the leaf (para) Stops the leaf drying out
Muka Supports the leaf
Pollen inside the flowers A fine powder produced by certain plants when they reproduce
Nectar inside the flowers Sweet for the birds and bees

The correct harakeke structures for the life processes are:

Life process

Harakeke structure

Making food Leaf (makes food for the plant using carbon dioxide, water and sunlight)
Converting the food to give energy All parts of the plant (every living part of a plant or animal needs energy)
Growing Young leaves (rito) and root tip (new growth comes from this point)
Reproducing Flower (where sexual reproduction takes place)
Getting rid of unwanted waste Tiny holes in the leaves (allows air to enter the leaf and waste gasses to leave)
Sensing their environment Root tip (has special cells that detect gravity and moisture)
Movement Seed pod (a case that opens when seeds are ready to be released)

Return to top ^